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BLOWING UP HINDRANCES AS YOU START UP

BLOWING UP HINDRANCES AS YOU START UP

I am Makhosazana Msibi, 28 years of age, born and bred in Carolina, Mpumalanga. I am a BA Psychology Graduate and I also hold a Post-Graduate Diploma in Educational Management. I am the Founder and CEO of Zamandlondlo Holdings, I am also the Founder and Chairperson of an NPO called YMCGO in Carolina-Mpumalanga, hence I am a mentor to many. I am currently promoting myself as an MC & an Event Planner and a Public Speaker. I am a Philanthropist at heart, currently I serve as a Music Researcher Volunteer on Rise FM, Mpumalanga. I am an Executive Secretary at my URCSA Congregation, Carolina. I am a former manager to DJ Soniq. I refer to myself as a Radio Guru, I have been invited for live radio interviews on Ligwalagwala FM, Rise FM and VOC FM and I look forward to achieving my dream in the radio or media industry. I have blogged for Leadership 2020, with an article titled “ones journey to success”.

Reality check at its core, blowing up as an entrepreneur or business man or rather woman can be devastating. One of the most devastating supreme involves having no capital to start your business, which can be a game changer. You can have this brilliant idea that could start off small but later on turn into millions or even billions and trillions for that matter. As one of our very own inspirational people “DJ Sbu” always says in his motivations “always grind and keep on hustling”. The big question here is how do you keep on grinding and hustling hard when you cannot even start up or register your business? it even worse when you are unemployed. The biggest setback for many people is getting capital to start the business and to sustain it for long-term endeavour. Reality within the entrepreneurial space is that it never easy making it to the top, even if you have a wonderful business idea, it is reality at its most ladies and gentlemen.

Earlier on I spoke about having a brilliant business idea and having no capital to start up your business and maintain it, hence the focus for today lies beneath the hindrances that exist in the process of blowing up as your start your business. It even worse when you know deep down in your heart that you want to own a business one day but find yourself not able to pin point your passion in the sphere. Our very own Vusi Thembekwayo always gives advice on starting with a purpose and passion, because if you do so you will never give up and you will never fail. Reality of the matter is that it ok to not figure out what your business sphere is, it normal but when you do seek entrepreneurial advice from those who have been there and those that are booming from success. It also ok not to have capital to start up or sustain your business, we all start there as infant entrepreneurs, business man or woman, it a learning curve and humbling moments we can reflect on years to come.

As we journey through in our businesses we need to bear in mind that not all doors that we knock to will respond positively to our requests. Hence there is also a saying that says “not all doors that are closed are locked”. No matter how much the going gets tougher, always stay in your lane, believe and always remind yourself why you started the business from the first place, by doing that you will have achieved hustler. In the words of Sibusiso Leope (DJ Sbu) keep on hustling hustler and always grind. One day it will all work out, never mind the hindrances you had to sacrum in the process or still are, you have and had to because it all part of the journey, the process and hustle as many would say. Always remember that regardless of the hindrances we may come across in life, dreams are worth achieving hustler, remain unshaken, determined and always passionate about your hustle.

– Makhosazana Msibi

Socials:
Facebook : YMCGO/Self-esteem ambassadors
Twitter : ymcgosa
Instagram : ymcgosa_npo

 

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Meet The Artiste – Janine Jkuhl

Meet The Artiste – Janine Jkuhl

Janine Jkuhl (pronounced Jay-Cool), born Janine Coombs in Kingston Jamaica, is an Independent- Alternative-Fusion Singer-Songwriter and Recording Artiste who admires the art of music. We got a chance to interview her and get to know more about her journey and her music.

 

Her eclectic love of different music genres can be heard fused in her albums “Star Gaze” (2009) and “Sweet Sway” (2020). She has been featured on the global news network CNN “The Voices of The Pandemic” reaching over 60 million people world wide, as well as featured on other international and local Jamaican television and radio programmes.

 

Many have compared her to Barbara Streisand, Esperanza Spalding and Sade. They have described her voice as Angelic and Pure, leaving you in a trance wanting to hear more. 

 

A part from being a performer, songwriter, producer, media host, music publicist and actress , she is a part-time researcher documenting the life and works of Jamaican composers for the Music Unites Jamaica Foundation, a non-for-profit organisation dedicated to preserving, educating, honing and building the Jamaican music cultural heritage.

 

Follow her at: 

 

IG: @janine_jkuhl

Youtube: Janine Jkuhl

 

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Lebo Diverse, a multi disciplinary creative

Lebo Diverse, a multi disciplinary creative

Lebo Diverse is a multi disciplinary creative, she produces and directs screen and theatre productions and tells stories through photography, videography, writing and performing.

 

Her book titled ‘Pieces of Expressions’ has received rave reviews in Germany and Lebo is set to perform in the UK soon.

 

As a passionate creative Lebo believes in collaboration and has co founded a creative hub called SEVEN27.

 

Thank you for visiting HOMEGROWN Radio and featuring on the HOMEGROWN Unplugged Stage

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I Love Radio Because……

I Love Radio Because……

Work and levels, goals and ambitions, dreams.  

Radio and life, the standards you set for your self, your consistency. 

Enjoying the journey, seizing the moment, honesty, authenticity, peoples perceptions, and much more!

Watch and get inspired by multi talented creative Thando Thabethe as she drops GEMS for I Was Born To Speak On Radio students.

If you want to join the radio family, we are at www.leadership2020.co.za or email us iwbts@leadership2020.co.za or call 0860995147

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Learn about Money with Amanda Baloyi on the Financial Game Changer Course

Learn about Money with Amanda Baloyi on the Financial Game Changer Course 

We measure the success of a business primarily by its financial status and the value it creates for its owners (shareholder). With so many businesses affected by the pandemic brought about by Covid-19, it is hard for a small business owner not to wonder if their business can realistically thrive given that even ‘giants’ are falling. This programme is the ultimate guide to making serious money, managing it and multiplying it massively in any economic state.

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Gareth Cliff shares advice to radio enthusiasts

Gareth Cliff shares advice to radio enthusiasts

I Was Born To Speak On Radio Is the fastest way to access the radio industry through a practical and sharp radio training programme that builds you, your talent and your radio game!

 

A 12 part radio training platform designed and executed by Leadership 2020 where you learn on line and get the chance to learn from the best in the game.

 

Contact us to join the radio family on iwbts@leadership2020.co.za or call 0860995147 

 

#radio #broadcasting #oralhistory #garethcliff #radiolovers #tellingstories #podcasting #cliffcentral #leadership2020 #iwbtsor #HGR




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Thando Thabethe visits I Was Born To Speak On Radio

Thando Thabethe visits I Was Born To Speak On Radio 

Students on the I Was Born To Speak On Radio course get an inside view to the minds, perspectives and the lessons learnt from professionals in the media business. Thando Thabethe speaks to I Was Born To Speak On Radio about choices and using rationale when making career decisions. Visit leadership2020.co.za or call us on 0860995147

 

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Releasing The Weights

Releasing The Weights

It is 08:00, Wednesday 23 June 2021. Location; Homegrown Farm, Centurion, South Africa. Although this venue has hosted 6 previous bootcamps, the 7th Homegrown Radio Bootcamp was different in so many ways. With a third Covid-19 wave and an adjusted alert level 3 lockdown announced, the number of attendees was significantly reduced to adhere to the restrictions. This was a blessing in disguise as it allowed for a more focused and intense training session. However, not all was lost for those who couldn’t make the cut for the physical attendance because the bootcamp was streamed live on Instagram and Facebook.

When I did not make the netball u12 A team, it took something out of me. When I went to boarding school in KZN and left all my friends behind, it took something out of me. When my first love fell from the 2nd floor and did not make it, it took something out me. When I failed my 3rd year at university, it took something out of me. And finally when I moved back home having lost everything – this was straw that broke the camel’s back, it took everything that was remaining out of me.



After several unsuccessful attempts to escape this life in a body ridden with scars from stolen razor blades, I was officially at rock bottom. At 100kg’s, I was extremely over weight, paralysingly unproductive and chocked by loneliness, I was consumed by pain and self-hatred – there was no light at the end of the tunnel. Negative thoughts cushioned my destructive behaviours.



Finding comfort in processed foods, I found myself almost automatically by a drive thru window – sometimes even more than twice a day. I recall ordering a triple decker from Debonairs, 18 Chicken Licken hot wings, a packet of orange Doritos, which would go hand in hand with a large packets of Jelly Teddies, this all before I get home open up that Mr D app to get myself some ribs.



As you know, one has to wash down the torture and the guilt, this would go perfectly with a 2litre beverage, and a six pack of something alcoholic and of course do not forget the two bottles of wine. With my phone turned off and everything an arm’s reach away it was time to put on my Netflix and pop a pill or two. Thousands of calories later with the emotional pain still as strong as ever and the physical guilt of what I am doing to my body weighing down on me, it was time to do it all again. I was suffering from financial, emotional, mental and physical destruction. Unemployed, broke and living back home with no dream and hope for the future, I looked at myself in the mirror disgusted by what I saw and told myself that my dream is to lose weight and be happy.



I had to make a choice to change my life but the hardest part was to believe that it could happen to me. I knew that if I wanted to achieve me dream, I had to see it, believe it and action it. If I wanted to release the weight I carried on my body, I had to release the weight I carried on my mind. I had to reprogram my mind to see the world in a completely new way and I had to trust that I am worth it and deserve it. So I started with changing what I was feeding my mind by listening to motivational content and cutting out the feel good junk. I found that by doing this, I began to take control of my relationship with food; I was drinking more water and actually enjoying it. A trick I learnt was to infuse my water with fruits and veggies to give it a bit of taste and learnt that by keeping it in the fridge easily availed made drinking it an absolute ease.



An important part of my journey was the realisation and acceptance that my body is the only vessel that is carrying me through life and if I wanted the best, I had to give it the best. This led to me researching Intermitted Fasting which I started, and watching closely what I eat opting rather for vegetable and salads – I joined then the Greens team. The power of the spirit is truly astonishing, using my two personal P’s-Phahla and Prayer- I found that was able to be patient with myself as I embarked on this never-ending journey of healing and weight- loss. I needed the support however, I was not in a position to share with anyone, so my ancestors and God became my own personal diary, day by day, the feeling of loneliness began to melt away.



Fundamental to overall wellness is building social connections and as my relationship with myself and my feelings towards myself started to take a more positive turn, I realised that it made it much easier to connect and build with others. If you can dream it, see it, believe it then action it – you can achieve it. We tend to carry the weight of the world on our shoulders and this more often than not blocks us from living out our purpose and true potential here on earth. It vital that we practice self –love on a daily basis through consistent discipline and action.



If we want to keep the weight off, we need to remain committed to our commitments. You need to accept that life is going to happen to you, but you need to push through. So when things so go south, you do not go with them. Patience is key, so don’t beat yourself up when you fall of the bandwagon, just make sure you get up, dust yourself off and get right back.



Love and Light all the time.



Your Girl Anele Kunene

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Learn, Laugh, and sip some coffee – a Homegrown Radio Bootcamp with a difference

Learn, Laugh, and sip some coffee – a Homegrown Radio Bootcamp with a difference

It is 08:00, Wednesday 23 June 2021. Location; Homegrown Farm, Centurion, South Africa. Although this venue has hosted 6 previous bootcamps, the 7th Homegrown Radio Bootcamp was different in so many ways. With a third Covid-19 wave and an adjusted alert level 3 lockdown announced, the number of attendees was significantly reduced to adhere to the restrictions. This was a blessing in disguise as it allowed for a more focused and intense training session. However, not all was lost for those who couldn’t make the cut for the physical attendance because the bootcamp was streamed live on Instagram and Facebook.

With the theme, “consistency is currency”, the day started with an intense warm-up session facilitated by Homegrown Fit’s no-nonsense muscleman, Sir Smats, which left the attendees sweating in the cold and gasping for air. This was followed by a moving talk by Leadership 2020’s motherly Desiree, who spoke about destiny, commitment, and the pitfalls of the internet. Desiree’s words haunted many as they reflected on the time they wasted on their electronic devices, and the harmful material they consume from the internet.

It was during this session that new recruits from the Central Johannesburg College (CJC) were welcomed to Homegrown Radio, where they will be working as interns in content production, technical production, sound, etc. Graduates from the I Was Born to Speak on Radio training course were also welcomed into the Homegrown family. While all this was happening, Lockdown Breakfast host, Karabo Pro Magasa was on the mic, having a conversation with veteran actor, Patrick Sanku Bokapa, known for his current role as Advocate Bopape on popular youth drama, Skeem Saam.

After the session with Desiree, the young broadcasters attended a masterclass on the art of coffeemaking from Monate Coffee’s Tumi Khobane, who taught them about the origins of coffee and the difference between blends of coffee. The shock on the faces of almost everyone when they learned that most of what they drink at home is more chicory than coffee was priceless.

 

After some coffee tasting and photo ops, it was time to get a practical example of hosting an impressive interview from legendary Zimbabwean broadcaster, Tony Friday. Tony was in conversation with entrepreneur and founder of Sheila Afari PR, Sheila Afari, who proved that consistency is indeed currency when she spoke about her humble beginnings, founding an events company as a student in Cape Town. Sheila spoke about how she stumbled upon entrepreneurship while she was studying Psychology and how consistency has sustained her ever since. Among other things, Sheila spoke about stereotypes some people have about women in leadership. This was prompted by a question from one of the students who asked if she ever comes across such challenges because she is a woman. Sheila Afari’s story and Tony Friday’s impeccable interview’s skill left the attendees inspired.

After lunch and all the in-depth learning, it was time for some belly laugh with stand-up comedy from Nkukza and Jazzbuda. Titled “Homegrown Unplugged”, this session was hosted by I Was Born to Speak on Radio graduate, KayKay. Guided by Leadership 2020’s Nicolas Regisford, Kaykay did an impressive job ushering the acts onto stage and directing the audience. The comedians had everyone in stiches with some jaw-dropping gags and some below-the-belt jabs. The comedy was followed by poetry from Lebo Diverse, a gender non-binary poet who uses a gender-neutral pronoun “they”. This was a learning moment for some of the attendees, and they handled it with humility and understanding. The session was closed by Ayisha, who delivered a moving poem about her experiences of discrimination and racism as a young, black Muslim.

 

 

 

True to tradition, the bootcamp wrapped up with testimonies from the students and graduates of the I Was Born to Speak on Radio training programme, followed by a closing prayer.

 

From the students’ testimonies, it is clear the 7th Homegrown Radio Bootcamp was a resounding success.

 

Are you born to speak on radio? To join our 12-part radio training course, email us on iwbts@leadership2020.co.za with “Radio” as the subject of your email.

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THE CREATIVE INDUSTRY, AN UNTAPPED ECONOMY WITH A LOT OF POTENTIAL

THE CREATIVE INDUSTRY, AN UNTAPPED ECONOMY WITH A LOT OF POTENTIAL

Article by Eddie Thaba (Scriptwriter)

South Africa is known as one of the biggest economies in Africa ($282.59bn). In fact, it had the third highest Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in the year 2020, with only Nigeria ($442.98bn) and Egypt ($361.88bn) ahead of it, according to Statista.com. This may sound like something worth celebrating, until you remember that just seven years ago, we were the number one economy in Africa. Nigeria took a leap past us in 2014 and has never looked back ever since. I am not going to pretend to be an economist by giving an analysis of where we went wrong or prescribe untested remedies to this. I’m just a creative writer who knows the immense economic contributions of the cultural and creative industries (CCIs) to the country’s GDP and alleviation of the scourge of unemployment. As a mineral rich country, I believe that the cultural and creative industry is one bottomless gold mine whose true riches we have yet to fully exploit.

Countries like the USA are world economic superpowers, not because of their mineral resources, but because of their CCIs. According to the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies in 2019 the value of arts and cultural production in America was $919.7 billion, which contributed 4.3% of its GDP. This contribution is bigger than those from construction, transportation and warehousing, travel and tourism, mining, utilities, and agriculture industries. A 2019 report by the Parliamentary Monitoring Group (PMG) reveals that in 2018 in South Africa, the cultural and creative industries contributed R63 billion to the GDP, which amounts to 1.7%. Does this mean that the American cultural and creative industry is bigger than ours? I beg to differ. Economically, maybe, but even that is because American culture (mainly through music, television, and film) is the most exported across the world. Such an omnipresence could not have been achieved without significant investment injected into the cultural and creative sector. This is one of the areas that we need to focus on if we are to improve the sector and rise to the level of economic superpowers like the USA.

I must applaud institutions like the Department of Arts and Culture (DAC) for investing in the cultural and creative industries through initiatives such as the Mzansi Golden Economy (MGE), however, Government alone will not win this battle. The private sector also needs to step in and make significant investments, not only financial but also in other forms, such as infrastructure, training, and others. Not forgetting the communities from which these creatives come; we should make consuming a product by a local artist a norm – and most importantly pay for it. The cultural and creative industry is the fastest growing economy, growing at an average rate of 2.4% per year between 2016 and 2018. This, according to the South African Cultural Observatory, is a better performance compared to the whole South African economy, which grew at only 1.1% per year in the same period. With enough support, it would not be impossible for the cultural and creative industry to double what it currently contributes to the country’s GDP in. This is what the creative economy is about.

Unlike traditional sources of economy, like mining, the cultural and creative industries derive their value from creativity and imagination, which will never run dry – hence I used the metaphor of a bottomless gold mine.

Apart from the economic contribution, the CCIs contribute to the labour market. In 2017, the creative economy accounts for 7% of all the jobs in South Africa, which amounts to about 1.14 million jobs. This industry that does not only contribute to the creation of jobs for artists but for people in a variety of fields. Take a typical film production as an example; the jobs created from this would range from scriptwriter, set designer, make-up artist, driver, catering, prop master, hair stylist, camera operator, actors, location scout, electrician, sound mixer, production assistant, colourist, composer, etc.  and these are not all of them. The same is true for theatre and touring ventures.

Imagine the contribution the cultural and creative industry, with significant financial backing, can make in the fight against unemployment. As much as we decry the scarcity of funding and resources, it is also incumbent upon us to take advantage of the opportunities when they present themselves. In fact, we should be proactively hunting down the opportunities and knocking on doors of both government and the private sector, instead of waiting for an open call for applications, which almost always results in a “traffic jam” and frustrations dues to last minute applications.

Visit www.eservices.gov.za to apply for the Mzansi Golden Economy. Applications close on 25 June 2021.